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Latin Terms

abbreviatus -Short
acuminatus –
Long tapering (gradually narrowed) point
acutifolius
– Having sharp leaves
adpressus –
Pressed together, pressed against
adscendens
– Rising, going up
aerius
– Of the air, as air-roots
affinus
– Related, connected, having an affinity
africanus
– From Africa
alatus
– Winged
albescens
– Pale, whitish
albidus, albus
– White
albiflorus
– Having white flowers
alpinus
– Of the alpines, mountains
alternus
– Alternating, not directly opposite
altus
– Altitude, tall
amabilis
– Amiable, lovely
amphibius
– Adaptable either to land or water
angulosus
– Angled, turning every which way
angustifolius
– With narrow leaves (rarely used term, more commonly used one is nerifolius)
aquaticus
– Of the water, water-loving
arborescens
– Growing like a tree, woody like a tree
arenatius
– Found in sandy places
argenteus, argentus
– Silvery
aristatus
– Bearded
arrectus
– Straight up, erect
ascendens
– Going up, ascending
asiaticus, asiatus
– From Asia
atlanticus
– Atlantic
atropurpureus, atropurpurea
–  Purple colour, sometimes also used for dark red
atrosanguineus
– Dark blood-red
atroviolaceus
– Dark violet
atrovirens
– Dark green
augustus
– Important in size or appearance, imposing
aurantiacus
– Orange-red
aureus
– Golden
azureus
– Light blue, azure
babylonicus
– Babylonian, from Babylon
balticus
– From the Baltic
bengalinis
– From Bengal
biennis
– Biennial
biflorus
– Two flowered
bifolius
–  Two leaved
brefolius
– With short leaves
brevis
– Short
brevisimus
– Very short
brillian
– Brilliant
brittanicus
– From Britain
brunneus
– Brown
bulgarius
–  Bulgarian
buxifolius
– With leaves like a boxwood, box-leaved
calamifolius
– With reed-like leaves
californicus
– From California
campestris
– Found in fields
candelabrum
– Having the form of a candelabra
candicans
– White or frosty looking
catitatus
– Headed
carneus
– Flesh-colored
cerefolius
– With waxy leaves
coccineus
– Bright red
coloratus
– Colored
columnaris
– Having the form of a column
concolor
– Similar coloring
conglomeratus
– All close together
contortus
– Twisted, contorted
cordatus
– Heart-shaped
cornutus, cornuta
– Horned
crassifolius
– With thick leaves
crenatus
– Serrated
cuspidatus
– Sharp tooth, or hard point
deformis
– Deformed
deliciosus, deliciosa
– Delicious
dendroideus
– Like a tree
densatus
– Dense
densifolius
– With dense leaves
densiflorus
– With dense flowers
dentatus
– Toothed, with a series of points
dipterus
– Two-winged
discolor
– Of two or several colors
dissectus
– Deeply cut leaves, an in fern-leaved maple
divaricatus
– Spreading
domesticus
– Domesticated
edulis
–  Can be eaten
elatus, elata –
Tall
elegans
– Elegant, graceful
elongatus
– Long
erectus
– Upright
excelsius, excelsus
– Tall
exoticus, exotica
– From another country
fastigiatus
– Having nearly vertical, close-together branches
ferox
– Fierce, thorny
flaccidus
– Soft, limp
flammeus
– Flame-colored
flexilis
– Bendable, flexible
florepleno
– With double flowers
florebundus
– With many flowers
foetidus
– Bad-smelling, having a fetid odor
fragrans
– Sweet-smelling, fragrant
fragrantissimus
– Very sweet-smelling
frutescens
– Bushy, shrubby, twiggy
gallicus
– From Gaul (France), may also pertain to a rooster
giganticus
– Large, gigantic
glaucus
– With a frost-like bloom, as on a grape
gloriosus, gloriosa
– Great, superb
gracilis
– Slender, graceful, lissome
grandifolius
– With large leaves
grandiflora –
With large flowers
gutatus
– Freckled
haemanthus
– Bright red flowers
humilis
– Dwarf, low ilicifolius holly-like leaves
japonicus
– From Japan
lancifolius
– With lance-like leaves
latifolius
– With broad leaves
leptolepis
– With thin scales
leptophyllus
– With thin leaves
leucodermis
– With white skin
lobularuis
– Lobed
luteus
– Yellow
macranthus
– With large flowers
maximus – The largest
medius
– Medium
megalophyllus
– With very large leaves
microphyllus
– With very small leaves
minimus
– Very small
mollis
– Hairy, fuzzy
myriophyllus
– With many leaves
nacro – Big, long, large
nanus, nana – Dwarf, small
nerifolius, nerifolia,
– With narrow leaves
niger
– Black
nodulosa
– With small nodes
nudifolia
– Deciduous, naked of leaves
oblongatus
– Oblong, oval
officinalis
– Medicinal
orientalis –
Oriental
parviflorus
– With small flowers
parvifolia
– With small leaves
patens
– Spreading
pinous
– Line-like
podocarpus
– With stalked fruits
polydactylus
– With many fingers
porphyreus
– Purple
praecox
– Very early
procumbens
– Procumbent, lying down
pumilus
– Dwarf, small
pygmaeus
– Pygmy
pyramidalis
– Pyramidal
repens
– Creeping, low
reticulatus
– With a netted pattern
robustus
– Strong, robust
rosea florus
– With rose-like flowers
rotundifolius
– With round leaves
scandens
– Climbing
semperflorens
– Everblooming
sempervirens
– Always green
serpens
– Creeping
serpyllifolius
– With thyme-like leaves
serratus
– With a saw tooth edge
stolenifera
– With runners that root and send up another plant
strictus
– Erect
sylvaticus
– Of the forest
tenuifolius
– With slender leaves
tomentosus
– Very wooly
tridens
– With three teeth or points
variegatus
– Variegated
verrucosus
– Warty
virens
– Green
virginianus
– Of Virginia, first defined in Virginia
viridis
– Green
vulgaris
– Common, vulgar, ordinary
xanthinus
– Yellow
zonalis
– Banded

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